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      11/27/2019 08:08 AM

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • SickBiker
      Rear wheel. This is a Merida Expert 27.5 rear wheel, laced around the Shimano SLX 12 speed hub. The cup and cone bearings on it doesn't spin as smoothly, as the DT Swiss 350, but it's much cheaper and some will prefer the silent freehub body, as opposed to quite loud DT Swiss ratchet system. I'll have the mullet wheelset system, meaning 29'er in the front and the 650B in the back.   The rear wheels weighs 1090 g and it is very durable. I've already made about 15.000 km on such wheels and they've survived many hits. No truing needed! My tires are: Maxxis Minion DHR II (rear) and Maxxis Assegai (front). Initially, I will run them with the inner tubes. This setup gives me a lot of confidence in any situation on the toughest trails. The Minion 27.5 weighs 1249 g and the inner tube additional 273 g. As I related in my video o YouTube, about rubbish things on new bikes, my inner tube (new!) failed to hold air and I needed to patch it! Make sure the tire sits straight, what a tiny line indicates (shown on the picture below). If the line goes in and out of the rim, you'll get up and down movement of your tire. Especially if the tire bead feels stiff, you can water it and the rim wall, before inflating the tire. Then inflate a bit more, that you desire for riding, so that the air will push the tire into place. Don't exceed the maxim pressure recommended!   The 12 speed Shimano SLX cassette requires the micro spline Shimano freehub body. The cassette is 10-50T and it weighs 528 g, but I would much rather install 10-45T for a powerful e-bike. The first eleven sprocket fir the splines on the freehub body, but the smallest one is actually being installed on the splines in the 11th sprocket. Make sure you fit it correctly!   All you need now is the cassette tool and you tighten the lockring pretty firmly with an adjustable wrench. I also cover the drivetrain with a little of Brunox Deo, so that no mud will stick and it will prolong the lifetime of all moving parts. Yes, it's been made for forks, but it works so well with my drivetrains!     Front wheel. My front wheel weighs 930 g and it's a 29 inch rim. The Assegai 29" tire weighs around 1290 g and the inner tube adds 241 g to the system. Both front and rear rim have 29/32 mm width. I will run the 203 mm Shimano SM-RT64 rotors. The rear one has the speed sensor magnet built in. The front rotor weighs 203 g (just as its diameter  ). The Shimano rotor lock ring weighs 20 g.   There you go! My wheelset is ready, let's start assembling the full suspension frame!
    • SickBiker
      Fast doesn't have to be harsh...   2021 Merida Reacto 6000 is the fourth generation of aero racing bikes, designed in Stuttgart Germany and made in Taiwan. I had the 3rd generation and I loved it. What has changed on the newest machine?     The new Reacto got even sleeker disc coolers, that now don't stand out. I like the forks dropouts, nicely integrated with the cooler. These brakes + these fins = a lot of braking power at high speed. In addition, the rear through axle lever is removable and becomes and allen key, which you can use not only for removing the wheels.   The joint of the seat tube and seat stays has  been lower now, creating even smaller and probably more aero rear triangle. It does look cool though  The rear derailleur hanger is completely new and it is the most sexy looking hanger I've seen on the bike so far!   The cables are now fully integrated, which improves the aerodynamics by a small margin. Merida's design doesn't interfere with turning the handlebars, which is better, than on most other brands, but just like on any FULLY integrated cables, I wish all the best to anyone, wanting to replace the housings... I don't like it and those, who have been following my YouTube channel know, that I will always miss the fully EXTERNAL cables. By the way - have you also noticed, that the new Reacto lost the eyebrow, that was beautifuly shaped on the third generation, from the head tube, through the top tube?   The other feature added to the new racer is the tire clearance - you can now ride an aero racing bike on 30c rubber! Great, because the aero frames tend to be more stiff and wider tires add a lot of comfort to our ride on any tarmac, even as bad as in my area...   An integrated multitool pocket under the saddle is a great idea. The only problem is, that it's not attached to the rails, but to the saddle itself, so when you replace the saddle, it means bye bye multitool. The seatpost still comes with the elastomer insert and this feature works! i   The pricelist of the new Merida Reacto is very competitive and I'm sure this bike will find many new owners in 2021. I would personally go for the cheapest version, that comes with a great Shimano 105 groupset. Please note, that there are 3 different frame levels for the Reacto: CF3, CF4 and the lightest CF5. Which model would you like to ride? 
    • Eli Keren
      Hi, Any good quality 29" carbon wheels supplier in Poland? Need a set for normal ride not racing, not too expensive, at 1300 grams.